CtC hacks into the fancy floor. Hearts break.

Everybody was busy but seemed like a slow day. Not a lot of visible progress. Maybe the last couple of days have just been huge and I've gotten numb.

The house is basically framed in. Have the plywood sheer panels in place everywhere but the back wall. We sorted the garage framing. They'll actually be able to frame the garage on the ground and raise it like they normally do. Getting a good sense of the windows, all four of them. Actually quite a bit of glass for only four windows!

They put the outside trusses up. Looks seriously cool. Can start to visualize what the ceiling inside will look like. The framers are liking the look too. Big sturdy volume...on a tiny scale. I think that means Jake (the architect) did a good job. 

 The square edges were planned when the slab was poured. The jagged edges were not. The mislocated vent pipe was where you see the blue rag.

The square edges were planned when the slab was poured. The jagged edges were not. The mislocated vent pipe was where you see the blue rag.

CtC took a saw to the floor. He has the drain and vent exposed so Bob the plumber can put things where they belong. CtC distracted me while the cutting was going on by assigning me work elsewhere. It was the compassionate thing to do.

 Two of the half of infinity one foot deep holes I drilled today. This is the NW corner of the house. If you look carefully you can see where the bad old stem wall is about 1.5 inches above the slab. In the SE corner, the slab is about 2 inches above the bad old stem wall.  The slab is covered by " Ram Board " to theoretically protect it from random damage during construction.

Two of the half of infinity one foot deep holes I drilled today. This is the NW corner of the house. If you look carefully you can see where the bad old stem wall is about 1.5 inches above the slab. In the SE corner, the slab is about 2 inches above the bad old stem wall.

The slab is covered by "Ram Board" to theoretically protect it from random damage during construction.

The code requires (I think it's) a 1 inch bolt be embedded in the foundation (the bad old stem wall) 12 inches deep every 4 feet around the perimeter. The bolt comes through the plate at the bottom of the exterior walls. Then each bolt gets a washer and nut and tightened. As far as you know each bolt will be torqued. The plate and the house ain't going anywhere.

CtC assigned me to drill the roughly infinity holes. I got through about half of them when the drill got real hot. Like too hot to hold and smelled like a hot motor hot. We gave the drill (and the driller, aka Musist) a rest. I'll finish tomorrow.

Then on Monday we will pay a "professional engineer" from the time he leaves his home until the time he returns to his home to observe the epoxying of the bolts in the hole. Apparently there is also the observing of the blowing out of the hole, the brushing of the inside of the hole, the measuring of the depth of the hole, and then the actual epoxying of the bolt in the now pristine hole. As some of you know we know professional engineers. You know who you are. They claim they are not licensed in the state of AZ. Really does not matter. The paying of the travel time from Denver would off-set any potential savings... And I know how and what they drink. The expense account would be killer. I'll pay the local guy and just bitch.

Here are today's shots. The first couple are of the candidate bathroom tile. It is proped up in the front doorway. The brown at the bottom is the concrete floor as it is revealed under the front door threshold. We tried like hell to use prefab stuff. But the best stuff is expensive and if any dimension is ever a little off we'd be screwed. Finally gave up and went to the tile store. The shown tile is 12 by 24 inches. We'll do a running bond (like brick) with a 1/8th inch grout line. Very modern!